Hydrangea Blooming and Daylilies for the Drive Beds!

Last night, my fans from Smokey’s Daylilies came in, so today was daylily day! I got the fragrant rebloomers collection on a great sale.  They came in the green and looking really good!

May May

May May

Winsome Lady

Winsome Lady

Hamlet

Hamlet

Yasmin

Yasmin

Pandoras Box

Pandoras Box

Pardon Me

Pardon Me

 

These went over the daffodils on the Drive Beds.  I weeded…again…as I went.  Even more poison ivy, coming from the mother vine that was going up that tree.  The roots can spread far, hidden just under the soil, and pop up quickly.  So I pulled as much of the roots out as I could.  I keep telling myself there’s less poison ivy each time I go in.  I hope I’m not lying to myself!

In the part of the Drive Bed that I’ve finally realized is truly sunny, I added the freebie Smokey’s sent me, a Mary Todd daylily, and I decided to slap the butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) in there, too.  My neighbor has had Asclepias tuberosa for years and no monarchs.  If we still have none next year, I might try rearing a few early in the season to get them breeding here locally.

I’ve also been (badly) needing to do an iris swap with my neighbor.  I have some bicolored German iris in my Street Garden, and she has some solid blue that will look much better with my alliums, Cardonna salvia, and the Walker’s Low nepeta/catmint, and both of us have areas of iris that are way bigger than we need for the spot, so we went out together and did some digging.  And a lot of weeding, too!  I dumped three buckets of non-poison ivy weeds today.

I also finally got all the mulch spread for the arborvitae.  Only took me about three months….  It was nice to clean up the bags, though!

Hydrangea arborescens, wild typeMy Hydrangea arborescens is going like gangbusters at the corner of the Drive Bed. I think mine is a true native wild type, not an Annabelle, as Annabelle is known for huge blooms, and mine definitely doesn’t have that!  It’s also taller than I am, which Annabelles don’t normally do, and it is very nicely upright.  It’s one of the few plants from the previous owners that I’m keeping.  I’ve ripped out almost everything else.  (There is still metal rebar sticking out of them from the previous owners.  They had great fears about cars running over their yard and plants, so they guarded the driveway with rebar.  I ended up having to put in short decorative fence posts because, yeah, no one can back out of my drive, but my dad added reflective tape, and they are a much friendlier kind of “guide” versus the threat of rebard scratching your car.)  They had some Taxus x media densiformis (a “gumdrop” yew) that was roughly the size of a small sedan that I pulled from several places because it was far, far too big, and then forsythia in the drive bed next to the neighbor’s lot.  This forsythia is evil.  It was completely ignored for years, which meant that it spread and spread and spread until it was 12 feet wide in some places.  I pull a little more out each time I weed.  It’s exhausting and demoralizing to do more than that.  Forsythia is very good at keeping itself well-watered at the expense of everything else, too, so all the other plants that were being strangled by it were completely miserable.  I’m much happier with my drive beds now, but I really need some nicely vertical yews for the edges!

I watered everything in, and then I spent the rest of the day working outside.  It was really that nice!  I’m not going to be doing anything much tomorrow, though, because that all took a long time.